Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.


Evergreen trees like this hemlock sometimes experience needle die-off due to strong, dry winds, many days of bright sunshine, and low relative humidity. Trees that are near the northern edge of their range, or trees that are stressed from too much or too little moist are most susceptible.
Evergreen trees like this hemlock sometimes experience needle die-off due to strong, dry winds, many days of bright sunshine, and low relative humidity. Trees that are near the northern edge of their range, or trees that are stressed from too much or too little moist are most susceptible. / Photo by Emily Stone
Loading ...

About the Cable Natural History Museum:

For over 45 years, the Cable Natural History Museum has served to connect you to the Northwoods. Come visit us in Cable, WI, at 13470 County Highway M. The current exhibit, ďDeer Camp: A Natural and Cultural History of White-tailed Deer,Ē opened in May 2013 and will remain open until April 2014.

Our new exhibit is about natureís superheroes. Like all superheroes, they each face their own type of kryptonite. This Conservation Sidekick is ready to help, thanks to the skilled brush of volunteer artist, Mimi Crandall. Original design by Donna Post. / Photo by Emily Stone

More

Spring is a season of change. All around me, things are changing color, new structures are being built, and a fresh cacophony of sounds fills the air. And thatís just inside the Museum! April is our exhibit construction month. Staff and volunteers demolished (and recycled) our old exhibit in just a few hours. Now the saws are humming, the cordless drills are whining, the carpenters are joking, and the paintbrushes are swishing.

A rainbow of geometric shapes grew to cover our dark green walls. Display boxes of all sizes and shapes, with hidden shelves for video equipment and holes for buttons and cords, seemed to spring up right out of the floor. A flat board metamorphosed into a flying superhero sidekick under the skilled brush of a volunteer artist.

Outside, a similar transformation is taking place. Bright sunshine and warm winds deconstruct winterís snowdrifts. Eagles and osprey return as the rivers and lakes open up, and they gather sticks to refurbish old nests and construct new ones. Spiders are coming out of hiding to weave their webs, and some insects, suspended in a juvenile form all winter, will soon start metamorphosing into adults.

One color change Iíve noticed is the browning of hemlock needles in my yard. Iíve also noticed discolored evergreen trees along highways. Those I know are from salt spray off the roads. Passing cars splashed up salty water all winter. The evergreen needles absorbed some of the salty liquid. Once enough salt accumulated, it became toxic, and the needles died back from the tips.

I was a little more surprised at the trees in my yard turning brown, since they are not near any road. Serendipitously, a few days after I noticed my browning hemlocks, the Minnesota DNR published an explanation: strong, dry winds, many days of bright sunshine, and low relative humidity all contribute to the needles drying out so much that they die. It is possible I only noticed the damage recently because weíve only had extended periods of strong sunshine recently.

Happily, the buds protecting new growth on trees are extremely tough, and tend not to experience winterkill. Even on the trees damaged by toxic road salt, new shoots will develop after spring rains wash the salt away.

So goes spring at the Museum, too!

Browse sandhill crane, prairie chicken, snowy owl, pelican, loon, goose, eagle, whooping crane, tundra swan, heron, turkey, cardinal, blue jay, woodpecker, hummingbird and other bird photos.

Soon we will forget our winter-dried skin, our season with little color, our spirits that withered during the last (last!?) blizzard. Just about the time that frogs start peeping from the wetlands and warblers start chatting in the woods, first graders will start peeping in the classroom and visitors will be chatting in the exhibit. Come share the excitement of spring with us and our new exhibitóNatureís Superheroes: Adventures with Adaptationsóthat opens May 1st!

Read more posts from Emily Stone.

Emily Stone is a Naturalist/Educator at the Cable Natural History Museum. Visit http://www.cablemuseum.org to learn more about exhibits and programs at the museum. For more from Emily Stone, visit her blog at http://cablemuseumnaturalconnections.blogspot.com/.

More In

Don't Miss

Join Our Team!

If you are interested in working for an innovative media company, you can learn more by visiting:

Gannett Careers

Wisconsin Day Trips

See all Day Trip Videoes


A new video will be shared in this series every Thursday

Get Published

Report on your outdoor group's news! Wisconsinoutdoorfun.com's Community Newsroom is a free service provided to clubs, nonprofits, schools, churches, families, scouting groups and civic organizations to publish their news, events and happenings on our website. Wisconsin residents with an interest in the outdoors are invited to write articles that Wisconsinoutdoorfun.com edits and shares with our readers online.

Submit an article today

Blogs